Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
push to prevent the economy from falling over the fiscal cliff next week. no specific bill is on the schedule in the senate or the house, and house republicans haven't yet called their members back to washington. and hopes for a deal by the december 31 deadline are fading. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the odds of avoiding the fiscal cliff did not get any better over the holiday. staff discussions continue, but there were few signs much, if anything has been accomplished. the house isn't even scheduled to return to washington yet, leaving it up to the senate to act. >> this is a senate that is incredibly divided, hopelessly partisan, requires 60 votes to do anything and somehow, we are going to be relying on them to in five days, come up with a compromise which is acceptable where a compromise wasn't acceptable in four years. >> reporter: it now looks like some kind of fall over the cliff is the likeliest scenario. and depending on how long it lasts, it could signal a prolonged fight over the debt limit that could spook markets again in february. >> the republicans are
next guest says once the fiscal cliff mess is resolved, there will be an explosion of meers and acquisitions in 2013. he's robert profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there. we need more m. & a in this cup. >> you are saying they are notgt ablocksblockbustermega deals buo medium companies, why is that. >> to do a step out deal therehe sense that things are good. m & a needs to be done. growth is thro slow and one of e ways to rise is to buy. everything is good but we have been held back by the negativism by the fiscal issues europe and the u.s. >> susie: you told me there were oil and gas americ mergersu think that tech cou
will celebrate new year's eve at work-- if not resolving the fiscal cliff, at least trying to avoid the blame. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: going over the fiscal cliff will not only have an impact on the national level, it will also hit states and eventually cities. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal before january 1, the cliff's across the board spending cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government sp
lawmakers prevent an economic crisis by agreeing on a fiscal cliff deal? darren gersh reports. >> reporter: here is a measure of how bad things are now in washington. markets rallied on news the house will come back to work on sunday, even though there is no solution ready for lawmakers when they return. and in the senate, which is back at work, republican leader mitch mcconnell warned he would not write a blank check to the white house, though he said he would keep an open mind on anything the president proposes. >> it appears to me the action, if there is any, is now in the senate side and we'll just have to see if we're able, on a bipartisan basis to move forward. >> reporter: senate majority leader harry reid said he too would try to reach agreement. but that was after spending most of the day hammering away at house republicans. reid blamed the current stand off on the inability of house republicans to pass their own plan which would have extended tax breaks for everyone making less than a million dollars a year. >> it's the mother of all debacles. that was brought up in an effort to
're going to give to. are people looking at the fiscal cliff and saying "i don't know"? >> absolutely. people are uncertain as to whether there's going to be a charitable deduction next year, things like the estate tax will change. so it's a rocky time. so some people are giving more and deciding "i'm going to get the tax break now and do it while it's a good thing for sure" and some people are putting off the decision deciding they isle give more later. so we're seeing a mixed bag but it's a tough time because this is the time of year when most people are doing a lot of charitable giving. >> ifill: let me get your name right this time, jackie, and ask you about federal employees. they are affected by this. there are furloughs, cutbacks, tell me what people are thinking. >> well, federal employees are in the unuely bad position of facing peril regardless of whether there's a deal. or whether sequestration and the fiscal cliff occurs. >> ifill: the across-the-board cuts. why does it work that way? >> in the event no deal is made and we do have the automatic cuts known as sequestration
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)